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Yoga

Yoga is a mind-body practice with origins in ancient Indian philosophy. The various styles of yoga that people use for health purposes typically combine physical postures, breathing techniques, and meditation or relaxation.

It can be highly individualized as there are many different types of yoga such as Ashtanga, Bikram, Iyengar, Anusara, Vinyasa and Kundalini and each one utilizes a different focus to assist in bringing the mind, body and soul together.

How it Works

It works by assuming different postures specific to that practice and then releasing the posture. Some practices incorporate meditation as a part of the class.

Yoga works subtly on the energetic level to clear out stuck energy while at the same time conditioning the body to bring in fresh energy through certain postures, and training the mind to be in present moment awareness.

Benefits

A regular yoga practice will assist one in sleeping more soundly, feeling more grounded, having less pain and achieving more focus. There are huge, emotional, physical and psychological benefits from engaging in regular yoga practice.

Precautions

Be mindful when trying different types of yoga, and go with what feels best for you since there are so many different styles. Do not push your body any further than it wants to go, as yoga has no connection to force.

Summary

Carl G. Jung, a famous Swiss psychologist, described yoga as “one of the greatest things the human mind has ever created.” The Yoga sutra, when translated, defines yoga defines it as, “Yoga is the cessation of agitation of the consciousness.”

The practice of whatever type of yoga you find beneficial for you will assist greatly in transcending the mind and allowing for more present moment awareness.

References

  • Introduction to Yoga by Annie Besant
  • Yoga for Beginners DVD
  • The Way of the Happy Woman: Living the Best Year of Your Life by Sara Avant Stover

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Treatment

Chinese Medicine

Traditional Chinese Medicine refers to a broad range of medicine practices sharing common theoretical concepts which have been developed in China and look back on a tradition of more than 2000 years, including various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, massage therapy, and dietary therapy.

These practices are a common part of medical care throughout East Asia, but are considered alternative medicine in the western world.

Chinese Medicine’s view of the body is little concerned with anatomical structures, but with the identification of functional entities (which regulate digestion, breathing, aging etc.). While health is perceived as harmonious interaction of these entities and the outside world, disease is interpreted as a disharmony in interaction.

Chinese Medicine diagnosis consists in tracing symptoms to an underlying disharmony, mainly by palpating the pulse and inspecting the tongue.

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Treatment

Reflexology

Reflexology is a natural non-invasive technique that involves the use of gentle pressure on certain “zones” of the feet, hands or ears that correspond to other areas of the body or organ systems producing a beneficial effect on those systems.

How it Works

Its works by the practitioner pressing on certain parts of the hands, feet or ears that has association with another body area or organ. The belief being that this pressure will have a beneficial effect on the organ or system being worked on.

Benefits

This has been found to be very useful in lessening anxiety, reducing stress and promotes a feeling of wellbeing. It is known to lessen fatigue and reduce muscular tension as well.

Precautions

This modality has been found to be extremely safe. However if you have pain in your hands, feet or ears you may want to consider an alternative healing method as this one uses those areas to complete a session.

Summary

Reflexology is a wonderful non invasive natural healing modality that involves the gently use of pressure to cause a beneficial effect on the body.

Many report that it has been beneficial on their journey to wellness. Reflexology is also an economical, natural way to augment your health, and you can easily learn to do this for yourself and your family.

References

  • The Everything Reflexology Book by Valerie Voner The Reflexology Bible by Louise Keet
  • Reflexology and Acupressure: Pressure points for Healing by Janet Wright
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Treatment

Homeopathy

Homeopathy as a treatment has existed for more than 200 years and is gaining greater acceptance in many countries, particularly the United States. It was developed and put into practice by a German physician – Samuel Hahnemann. Since the days of Queen Victoria of Great Britain and till today an attending physician of the royal family is traditionally a homeopath.

The difference of homeopathic remedies from traditional drugs is incorporated in the name of “homeopathy” (homois – like, pathos – sickness, suffering). The basic principle of homeopathy is the similarity between a cure and an illness.

The treatment of a disease requires application of small amounts of substances that in large doses cause a healthy person to suffer phenomena with similar clinical presentation (i.e., complaints and symptoms) of a patient.

Here is a simple example: when people cut onions, their eyes tear and suffer a running nose – in short, it is the same effect as a cold or an allergic reaction. By deriving medicines from onions, homeopaths successfully treat a common cold, allergic rhinitis and conjunctivitis. This is the principle of similarity.

Homeopathy does not seek to replace conventional antibiotics, sulfonamides and other anti-inflammatory drugs, but offer a complementary approach to preventing and healing illness.

How It Works

A specially trained pharmacist is responsible for preparing homeopathic medicines. They combine one part of a starting material and 99 parts of solvent – distilled water or alocohol. This is the first dilution. Then, one part of the first dilution is combined with 99 parts of a new solvent. Such a process is repeated multiple times. Homeopathic medicines are issued in dilution (potency) in the form of granules, drops or tablets. A dose is assigned individually and may change during treatment.

As supplements, they are usually taken 15-20 minutes before a meal or 1 hour after a meal. In acute conditions, a frequent intake (every 10-30 minutes) may be prescribed. Treatment duration, frequency and amount depend on the dynamics of the condition being treated.

A homeopath usually learns a history of a patient, conducts examination and communication with a patient to determine constitutional and personal traits. Only after this, a tactic of homeopathic treatment is produced. The raw materials for traditional homeopathic medicines are substances of plant, animal and mineral origin.

Benefits

The main advantages of homeopathy are:

  • Friendliness and safety
  • An individual approach to a patient
  • The use of medicine in small doses
  • The absence of addiction and withdrawal syndrome
  • The ability to use multiple medicines at the same time
  • The possibility of a combination of traditional and other treatments
  • Treatment of all age groups, ranging from fetal and neonatal period

Precautions

Homeopathy can be used for many types of conditions, but is difficult to treat people intoxicated with chemicals and people who are sick with serious illnesses: cancer, multiple sclerosis, etc. In such cases, homeopathy can only reduce a disease. Sometimes homeopathic medicines can exacerbate the symptoms one is experiencing. In such cases, the dose or frequency of administration should be reduced or temporarily discontinued.

Summary

Homeopathy is based in two primary theories:

  1. “Like cures Like” – a disease can be cured by a substance that produces similar symptoms in healthy people.
  2. “Law of Minimum Dose”- the lower the dose of the medication, the greater its effectiveness. Some homeopathic remedies are so diluted that no molecules of the original substance remain.

References

  • Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine, 9(6), 949-57., Aickin, M. (2003).
  • Integrative Cancer Therapies, 5(4), 293-307., Bell, I., Koithan, M. (2006).
  • Journal of Alternative & Complementary Medicine, 10(2), 269-83., Bell, I., Lewis, D., Brooks, A. et al. (2004).
  • Evidence-based Complement Alternate Medicine, 3(1), 13-24., Bellavite, P, Conforti, A., Pontarollo, F. et al. (2006).